Types of Conduct Hearings

Based on the information gathered, the Office of Residence Life will decide whether to proceed with a case. If the Office of Residence Life decides to go forward, it will decide whether to proceed with the case as a Standard Conduct Hearing or Formal Conduct Hearing.

Each type of hearing has the same purpose: to determine if a student is responsible for the alleged violation(s), to help the student learn about the consequences for choices he or she made, to educate the student about University policies, and to provide pastoral care and education for the student involved. The primary difference between the types of hearings is who conducts them and the level of sanction that can be assigned.

Standard Conduct Hearing

Standard Conduct Hearings are designed to allow for the investigation, discussion, and resolution of alleged violations of University policies and standards of conduct and of residence hall and University policies and expectations that may lead to any sanctions less than suspension or dismissal from the University.

Prior to the hearing, the charged student may review his or her student conduct file and have the University student conduct process explained. Both prior to and during the hearing, the charged student may ask questions to clarify any confusion he or she may have regarding the hearing or student conduct processes.

A full-time student or current faculty or staff member may accompany a student to his or her Standard Conduct Hearing and serve as his or her support person. The support person may assist the student in preparing for the hearing and may speak to their community citizenship. The support person is not required to have firsthand knowledge of the incident. Any support person who comes to any additional meetings related to the conduct process must also be a full-time student or current faculty or staff member. The charged student must submit the name of the support person he or she wishes to bring to a hearing to the hearing officer twenty-four (24) hours prior to the hearing.


On-Campus Students

All residence halls are guided by policies and expectations designed to create communities grounded in mutual respect and lead to personal growth and maturation. Students are expected to know and follow the policies and expectations governing life in the hall in addition to those governing life at the University as a whole.

Generally, a member of the Residence Life staff (most often the Hall Director) or their designee hear cases that involve violations of University and/or residence hall policies or procedures. Depending on the specific factors of a case, sanctions may include, but are not limited to, community service hours, monetary fines, residence hall probation, counseling assessment, alcohol education, written reflection, a recommendation of removal from the hall, probation, or other sanctions which meet the particular circumstances of a specific case.

If in the course of the Standard Conduct Hearing the hearing officer determines that a Formal Conduct Hearing is the more appropriate setting, he or she will stop the hearing and a Formal Conduct Hearing will be scheduled for a later date.

Off-Campus Students

Violations of University policies or procedures by off-campus students that will result in an outcome that is less than suspension or dismissal from the University will be handled in a Standard Conduct Hearing. The Office of Residence Life will hear Standard Conduct Hearings for off-campus students. Depending on the specific factors of a case, sanctions may include, but are not limited to, monetary fines, counseling assessment, alcohol education, community service, written reflection, or other sanctions that meet the particular circumstances of a specific case.

If in the course of the Standard Conduct Hearing the hearing officer determines that a Formal Conduct Hearing is the more appropriate setting, he or she will stop the hearing and a Formal Conduct Hearing will be scheduled for a later date.

Formal Conduct Hearing

Formal Conduct Hearings are the appropriate setting for violations of University policies and procedures that may result in an outcome of suspension or dismissal. The Office of Residence Life coordinates Formal Conduct Hearings, and they are generally run by the Associate Director for Community Standards and one or two additional university conduct officers. Prior to the Hearing, the charged student may review his or her student conduct file and have the University Student Conduct Process explained. Both prior to and during the Hearing, the charged student may ask questions to clarify any confusion he or she may have regarding the Hearing or student conduct processes.

A full-time student or current faculty or staff member may accompany a student to his or her Formal Conduct Hearing and serve as the support person. The support person may assist the student in preparing for the hearing and may speak to their community citizenship. The support person is not required to have firsthand knowledge of the incident. Any support person who comes to any additional meetings related to the conduct process must also be a full-time student or current faculty or staff member.

Students may also bring witnesses who have firsthand knowledge of the incident to their Formal Conduct Hearings. Witnesses must be current students, faculty, or staff.

Charged students must submit the names of the witnesses or support person they wish to bring to a hearing to the Associate Director for Community Standards twenty-four (24) hours prior to the hearing. Upon request of the charged student, the Office of Residence Life will provide the name(s) of any other witness(es) invited to the Formal Conduct Hearing. During the hearing a student may, with the assistance of the hearing officer(s), ask questions of any witnesses present.

Students may also bring other kinds of evidence, such as documents, photographs, or other physical items, to present at their hearing. Students should inform the Office of Residence Life of the items they intend to present at their hearing twenty-four (24) hours prior to the hearing.